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Gambling in the USA

Joan Barron says Locals are controlling gambling in Wyoming

George Miller

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Barron: Locals to control gambling
Reading Time: 3 minutes

Because of differing cultures, Wyoming’s cities, towns and counties are in the best position to regulate the games of bingo and pull tabs.

That was the main argument in the debate over which entity should regulate the games. The alternative was to put the game regulatory authority under the Wyoming Pari-Mutuel Commission.

But that move would grow state government, which is an unpopular approach in light of the state’s fiscal problem.

Local control prevailed last week as the Legislature’s Joint Interim Committee on Travel, Recreation and Wildlife voted for a bill to be introduced during the short legislative session in February.

Sen. Bruce Burns, R-Sheridan, who proposed the bill, said that currently the games operate unfettered with no oversight whatsoever.

Thus, if a player or other resident suspects the barkeep, for example, is siphoning money from the pull tabs pot he or she has no place where a complaint can be lodged.

If the committee bill passes and a city or county decides to regulate the games, the people can take their complaint to the local police or the sheriff’s office.

The bill also creates some income for the cities and counties that regulate the games.

The draft bill allows the locals to set reasonable fees of up to one percent of the net profits.

I’m not trying to get rid of the pull-tabs,” Burns said in an interview last week. “The bill is intended to be revenue neutral. I want local officials to know who’s running the games.

Letting the locals decide if they want to regulate the games is the right step given the different values and cultures in the state. 

Campbell County and the City of Gillette, Burns noted, do not have the same culture as predominantly Mormon communities like Lovell and Cokeville or Alpine, which are more likely to oppose gambling.

However, these communities have no control whatsoever over the games now. If they don’t want to regulate the games, they don’t have to do so.

For many charitable organizations the income from the games is critical to their operations.

In Sheridan, Burns said, he knows of three charitable organizations that would close within six months without the income from bingo and pull tabs operations.

The current law requires operators of bingo games to contribute 65 percent of the net profits to charitable organizations. For pull tabs the contribution is 50 percent of net profits.

Giving the regulatory task to the locals will avoid expanding an existing state agency or setting up a new one like those in surrounding states.

In Colorado, the Secretary of State’s Office web site has 55 pages of detailed rules on bingo games, including electronic bingo and raffles.

The state of Montana’s list of rules is even longer. Montana’s program is run by the state’s Gambling Control Division. Under Montana law, businesses must have a liquor license before they can conduct some gambling activities like live card games and video gambling machines.

In Wyoming, bingo has to be a live game, Burns noted. Electronic bingo is not legal.

During the committee meeting, Mike Moser, executive director of the Wyoming Liquor Association, said his organization doesn’t support the bill.

But Moser, who was part of a small task force group appointed to work on the bill, said it would prevent fly-by-night questionable operations from moving into the state.

Rick Kaysen, the executive director of the Wyoming Association of Municipalities and a former Cheyenne mayor, said his association doesn’t necessarily favor the bill, either.

But Kaysen, who also was a member of the task force on the bill, said it is “workable,” and reflects an issue that has been discussed for the last years in particular.

Until fairly recently Wyoming had a reputation as an anti-gambling state.

Yet bingo games in Wyoming have been less tightly regulated than in most other states.

The state currently allows tribal casinos, a state lottery, horse racing and off-track betting. The Legislature didn’t adopted the lottery until 2013.

 

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George Miller started his career in content marketing and has started working as an Editor/Content Manager for our company in 2016. George has acquired many experiences when it comes to interviews and newsworthy content becoming Head of Content in 2017. He is responsible for the news being shared on multiple websites that are part of the European Gaming Media Network.

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Gambling in the USA

PointsBet Partners With Catfish Bend Casino in Iowa

Niji Narayan

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PointsBet Partners With Catfish Bend Casino in Iowa
Photo Source: kbur.com
Reading Time: 1 minute

 

PointsBet, the top-tier sportsbook operator, has entered a multi-year partnership with Catfish Bend Casino, one of Iowa’s leading casino, entertainment, and hotel destinations.

The partnership will include the launch of both premium retail and mobile sportsbook operations in Iowa, following proper licensing afforded by the Iowa Racing and Gaming Commission. PointsBet and Catfish Bend Casino will work in tandem to build out a multi-faceted sports entertainment venue centrally located on the Catfish Bend property.

“PointsBet is thrilled to announce this partnership, enabling us to create a first-class sportsbook for Iowa’s sports bettors at one of the best casino resorts in the Midwest. Catfish Bend Casino’s executives – Gary Hoyer and Rob Higgins – are two of the most progressive and forward-thinking operators in the industry. We knew they were the perfect match for PointsBet’s long-term vision of gaming in the U.S. from day one,” Johnny Aitken, PointsBet’s U.S. CEO said.

“We couldn’t imagine a better sportsbook to bring to Catfish Bend Casino and the state of Iowa. The potential legalization of sports betting in Iowa opens an exciting new opportunity for recreational and avid players, and PointsBet’s unmatched dedication to bettors makes them the ideal partner for our brand and go-to-market plan,” Gary Hoyer, CEO of Great River Entertainment said.

 

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Gambling in the USA

Delaware North Sues Miomni Gaming Over Fraudulent Claims

Niji Narayan

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Delaware North Sues Miomni Gaming Over Fraudulent Claims
Photo Source: hhlarchitects.com
Reading Time: 1 minute

 

Delaware North, the US based casino operator, has filed a lawsuit against its sports betting joint venture partner Miomni Gaming.

The operator is seeking monetary damages through the suit filed in the Chancery Court of Delaware, including Miomni’s 49% stake in the BetLucky joint venture, which the supplier is apparently refusing to give up. The joint venture was made to launch the BetLucky sports betting platform. Delaware North then terminated the contract earlier this month.

The operator claims Miomni made fraudulent claims to induce it to enter into a joint venture, as well as of wilfully breaching a limited liability company agreement governing the operation of BetLucky.

Delaware North claims that Miomni and chief executive Venner repeatedly claimed to own intellectual property rights to the platform, including the source code for the front end and back end of the platform.

 

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Compliance Updates

PGCB Imposes Fine Totalling US$242k on Two Casino Operators

Niji Narayan

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PGCB Imposes Fine Totalling US$242k on Two Casino Operators
Photo Source: pennsylvaniacasinos.com
Reading Time: 1 minute

 

The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board (PGCB) has imposed the fines totalling US$242k against two casino operators.

Sands Bethworks Gaming, LLC, operator of the Sands Casino Resort in Northampton County, received separate fines of US$120k for underage gaming violations and a second for US$110k regarding the awarding of free slot play. The fine stemmed from 11 incidents in which individuals under the age of 21 accessed the gaming floor.

The second fine was issued for permitting the issuance of free slot play by employees who were not authorised to do so and/or issuing free slot play of amounts above authorised levels.

Washington Trotting Association, LLC, operator of the Meadows Racetrack and Casino in Washington County, received a US$12.5k fine for an underage gaming violation. This fine stemmed from an 18-year-old male gaining access onto the gaming floor, wagering at table games and being served alcohol.

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