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European Commission Press Releases

Preparing Europe’s future, building on a strong Digital Single Market: joint statement

Zoltan Tundik

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Digital Single Market debate with Vice President Andrus Ansip - Photo Credits: European Commission
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Preparing Europe’s future, building on a strong Digital Single Market: joint statement by Vice-Presidents Ansip and Dombrovskis, Commissioners Oettinger, Andriukaitis, Bieńkowska, Moedas and Gabriel following the Digital Day 2018

Press Release – Brussels, 10 April 2018

At Digital Day 2018, Ministers and representatives of Member States recalled their commitment to complete the Digital Single Market, and agreed to work together more in a series of key areas for Europe’s future: artificial intelligence, blockchain, ehealth and innovation.

European Commission Vice-Presidents Andrus Ansip and Valdis Dombrovskis, Commissioners Günther H. Oettinger, Vytenis Andriukaitis, Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Carlos Moedas and Mariya Gabriel, welcomed the results achieved today:

Today’s commitments by Member States give a strong signal: we all understand that Europe’s future is digital and that the only way to fully reap the benefits of new technologies is by working together, joining forces and resources.

By pooling health data, using artificial intelligence and blockchain and promoting innovation, Europe can significantly improve people’s lives. Earlier and better diagnosis of diseases, safer roads – this is only a glimpse of what embracing digital change can look like.

We have made significant progress in building a Digital Single Market since the first Digital Day in Rome last year. People are starting to feel the benefits of tearing down digital borders: the end of roaming charges and unjustified geoblocking, portability of online content.

Stronger rules on the protection of personal data and the first EU-wide rules on cybersecurity will become a reality in May 2018. But we need to accelerate our efforts: key proposals, from the free flow of non-personal data to better connectivity, still need to be agreed by the European Parliament and Member States. They are essential for the development of technologies such as artificial intelligence. Europe also needs to invest more in digital, research and innovation.

We are creating a strong Digital Single Market – let’s build on this to make sure that Europe has a bright digital future.”

 

For more information:

Press release: Digital Day 2018: EU countries to commit to doing more together on the digital front

Opening speech by Vice-President Ansip, Digital Day 2018

Opening speech by Commissioner Gabriel, Digital Day 2018

Factsheet: A Digital Single Market for the benefits of all Europeans

Timeline: Digital Single Market – Commission actions since 2015

Declaration on Artificial intelligence

Declaration on eHealth

European Blockchain Partnership

Declaration on Innovation Radar online tool

Video Innovation Radar

New initiatives on 5G cross-border testing corridors

Digital Day 2017 in Rome

#DigitalDay18

STATEMENT/18/3167

Press contacts:

Nathalie VANDYSTADT (+32 2 296 70 83)
Inga HOGLUND (+32 2 295 06 98)
Julia-Henriette BRAUER (+32 2 298 07 07)

General public inquiries: Europe Direct by phone 00 800 67 89 10 11 or by email

After starting out as an affiliate in 2009 and developing some recognized review portals, I have moved deeper into journalism and media. My experience has lead me to move into the B2B sector and write about compliance updates and report around the happenings of the online and land based gaming sector.

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European Commission Press Releases

Digital Single Market: EU negotiators reach a political agreement on free flow of non-personal data

George Miller

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EU negotiators reach a political agreement on free flow of non-personal data
Mariya Gabriel, Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society. Photo Credits: EPA/BGNES
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Brussels, 19 June 2018 – Digital Single Market: EU negotiators reach a political agreement on free flow of non-personal data

The European Parliament, Council and the European Commission tonight reached a political agreement on new rules that will allow data to be stored and processed everywhere in the EU without unjustified restrictions. The new rules will also support the creation of a competitive data economy within the Digital Single Market.

Vice-President for the Digital Single Market Andrus Ansip said:”Data localisation restrictions are signs of protectionism for which there is no place in a single market. After free movement of people, goods, services and capital, we have made the next step with this agreement for a free flow of non-personal data to drive technological innovations and new business models and create a European data space for all types of data.

Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society Mariya Gabriel said: “Data is the backbone of today’s digital economy and this proposal will help to build a common European data space. The European data economy can become a powerful driver for growth, create new jobs and open up new business models and innovation opportunities. With this agreement we are one step closer to completing the Digital Single Market by the end of 2018.”

The new rules will remove barriers hindering the free flow of data, and boost Europe’s economy by generating an estimated growth of up to 4% GDP by 2020.

The new free flow of non-personal data rules will:

  • Ensure the free flow of data across borders: The new rules set a framework for data storing and processing across the EU, prohibiting data localisation restrictions. Member States will have to communicate to the Commission any remaining or planned data localisation restrictions to the Commission in limited specific situations of public sector data processing. The Regulation on free flow of non-personal data has no impact on the application of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), as it does not cover personal data. However, the two Regulations will function together to enable the free flow of any data – personal and non-personal – thus creating a single European space for data. In the case of a mixed dataset, the GDPR provision guaranteeing free flow of personal data will apply to the personal data part of the set, and the free flow of non-personal data principle will apply to the non-personal part.
  • Ensure data availability for regulatory control: Public authorities will be able to access data for scrutiny and supervisory control wherever it is stored or processed in the EU. Member States may sanction users that do not provide access to data stored in another Member State.
  • Encourage creation of codes of conduct for cloud services to facilitate switching between cloud service providers under clear deadlines. This will make the market for cloud services more flexible and the data services in the EU more affordable.

The agreed measures are in line with existing rules for the free movement and portability of personal data in the EU.

 

Background

The Commission presented a framework for the free flow of non-personal data in September 2017 as a part of President Jean-Claude Juncker‘s State of the Union address to unlock the full potential of the European Data Economy. It was announced as one of the key actions in the mid-term review of the Digital Single Market strategy.

 

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European Commission Press Releases

Codewise’s Dr. Rzeszuciński Joins the European AI Alliance, Launched by the European Commission

George Miller

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Codewise's Dr. Rzeszuciński Joins the European AI Alliance
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LONDONJune 18, 2018 — Codewise, the industry’s first provider of AI-powered online ad measurement and management solutions for digital marketers, announced today that Dr. Paweł Rzeszuciński, Data Scientist at Codewise, accepted the invitation to become a member of the European AI Alliance, a forum launched by the European Commission.

Since Dr. Paweł Rzeszuciński will join the Alliance within his personal capacity, he will act independently and in the public interest, as per the rules set by the European Commission.

Following the signing of the Declaration of cooperation on Artificial Intelligence by 24 EU Member States and Norway, the European AI Alliance, as announced by the European Commission on April 25 2018, is a multi-stakeholder forum engaged in a broad and open discussion of all aspects of Artificial Intelligence development and its impact on the economy and society. The European AI Alliance is aimed at seizing the opportunities of AI, reinforcing Europe’scompetitiveness and establishing the ethical guidelines on the development of the AI.

Emphasizing the importance of the European AI Alliance, Robert Gryn, CEO of Codewise, said, “We are extremely proud to learn that Dr. Paweł Rzeszuciński, a key stakeholder of Codewise’s Artificial Intelligence development team, is joining such a strategic initiative. AI is progressively transforming our economy and society and is increasingly contributing to many sectors of our economy. We feel very reassured by the European Commission’s initiative to support the implementation of a European strategy on AI.

The Commission will present ethical guidelines on AI development by the end of 2018, based on the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights, taking into account principles such as data protection and transparency, and building on the work of the European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies. To help develop these guidelines, the Commission will bring together all relevant stakeholders at the European AI Alliance.

The mission of the European AI Alliance strongly resonates with Codewise’s values and vision of transparency-led smart technologies,” said Dr. John Malatesta, President and Chief Revenue and Marketing Officer at Codewise. “As any technology that has a direct impact on people’s and businesses’ lives, the emergence of AI also raises legitimate concerns. We fully endorse the elaboration by the European Commission of recommendations on future AI-related policy development and on ethical, legal and societal issues. In our daily efforts to develop AI technologies at the service of digital marketers, we are equally attentive to the right balance between business efficiency gains on one side and respect for privacy and transparency on the other. The definition of an AI strategy framework will help the entire software industry align to common standards.

The foundation of the European AI Alliance represents a first step towards an EU-wide approach to AI. By establishing clear guidelines on AI ethics, the Commission seeks to increase consumers’ trust in AI-driven products.

Based on the recommendations enacted by the European AI Alliance, the European Commission and participating Member States will present a European plan on Artificial Intelligence by the end of 2018.

 

About Codewise:

Founded in 2011, Codewise is the industry’s first provider of AI-powered online ad measurement and management solutions for digital marketers. For years, Codewise has been recognized as one of the fastest-growing technology companies in Europe, according to the Financial Times, Statista, and Deloitte.

Codewise’s solutions help thousands of businesses in 190 countries to track, measure, and optimize billions of dollars of advertising spend, boosting their efficiency and ROI like never before. Codewise is currently tracking over $2.5 billion of digital ad spend for some of the world’s largest brands and ad agencies, including $400 million of ad spend on Facebook.

To learn more about Codewise, please visit www.codewise.com.

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European Commission Press Releases

Digital Single Market: EU negotiators reach a political agreement to update the EU’s telecoms rules

Zoltan Tundik

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Photo Credits: © European Union , 2015 / Source: EC - Audiovisual Service / Photo: Christophe Maout
Reading Time: 3 minutes

Brussels, 6 June 2018 – The European Parliament and the Council reached late last night a political agreement to update the EU’s telecoms rules. The new European Electronic Communications Code, proposed by the Commission, will boost investments in very high-capacity networks across the EU, including in remote and rural areas.

Vice-President in charge of the Digital Single Market, Andrus Ansip said: “This agreement is essential to meet Europeans’ growing connectivity needs and boost Europe’s competitiveness. We are laying the groundwork for the deployment of 5G across Europe.

Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, Mariya Gabriel, said: “The new telecoms rules are an essential building block for Europe’s digital future. After several months of tough negotiations, we have agreed on bold and balanced rules to provide faster access to radio spectrum, better services and more protection for consumers, as well as greater investment in very high-speed networks.

The agreed rules are crucial for achieving Europe’s connectivity targets and providing everyone in the EU the best possible internet connection, so they can participate fully in the digital economy.

The new Electronic Communications Code will:

  • Enhance the deployment of 5G networks by ensuring the availability of 5G radio spectrum by end of 2020 in the EU and providing operators with predictability for at least 20 years in terms of spectrum licensing; including on the basis of better coordination of planned radio spectrum assignments.

  • Facilitate the roll-out of new, very high capacity fixed networks by making rules for co-investment more predictable and promoting risk sharing in the deployment of very high capacity networks; promoting sustainable competition for the benefit of consumers, with a regulatory emphasis on the real bottlenecks, such as wiring, ducts and cables inside buildings; and a specific regulatory regime for wholesale only operators. Moreover, the new rules will also ensure closer cooperation between the Commission and the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC) in supervising measures related to the new key access provisions of co-investment and symmetric regulation.

  • Benefit and protect consumers, irrespective of whether end-users communicate through traditional (calls, sms) or web-based services (Skype, WhatsApp, etc.) by:

  • ensuring that all citizens have access to affordable communications services, including universally available internet access, for services such as egovernment, online banking or video calls;
  • ensuring that international calls within the EU will not cost more than 19 cents per minute, while making sure that the new rules would not distort competition, innovation and investment;
  • giving equivalent access to communications for end-users with disabilities;
  • promoting better tariff transparency and comparison of contractual offers;
  • guaranteeing better security against hacking, malware, etc.;
  • better protecting consumers subscribing to bundled service packages;
  • making it easier to change service provider and keep the same phone number, including rules for compensations if the process goes wrong or takes too long;
  • increasing protection of citizens in emergency situations, including retrieving more accurate caller location in emergency situations, broadening emergency communications to  text messaging and video calls, and establishing a system to transmit public warnings on mobile phones.

 

Background

At work, at home or on the move, Europeans expect an internet connection that is fast and reliable. Encouraging investments in very high-capacity networks is increasingly important for education, healthcare, manufacturing or transport. To meet these challenges and prepare Europe’s digital future, in September 2016 the Commission proposed the establishment of a European Electronic Communications Code and a proposal for a Regulation on the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications. The Code will modernise the current EU telecoms rules, which were last updated in 2009, stimulate competition to drive investments and strengthen the internal market and consumer rights.

In March 2018 the Parliament and the Council agreed on the way forward for radio spectrum management to be able to introduce 5G in the EU. Once fully adopted by the European Parliament and the Council, Member States will have two years to transpose the Electronic Communications Code into national law.

For More Information

Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI) including data on connectivity per country

More on telecoms

 

IP/18/4070

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