Connect with us
SOFTSWISS

Compliance Updates

Spillemyndigheden: Input is wanted for the Money Laundering Secretariat’s indicators for money laundering and terrorist financing

Published

on

Spillemyndigheden: Consultation on Updated Certification Programme for Betting and Online Casino
Reading Time: < 1 minute

 

The Danish Gambling Authority calls on the gambling industry to provide input to the Money Laundering Secretariat’s indicators for money laundering and terrorist financing on GoAML.

When making a notification via GoAML, indicators must be selected. The indicators are an aid to those subject to notification and to the Money Laundering Secretariat, so that potential money laundering and terrorist financing can be better identified. At present, the “money laundering through gambling” indicator can be selected if the notification relates to gambling.

On the basis that the gambling industry has expressed a desire for more relevant indicators, the Danish Gambling Authority has been in dialogue with the Money Laundering Secretariat. The Money Laundering Secretariat has indicated that they will accept proposals for more indicators relating to money laundering through gambling.

The Danish Gambling Authority therefore encourages the industry to provide input on which indicators are desired in GoAML.

How can you provide input?

If you wish to provide input, you can send this to the Danish Gambling Authority at [email protected] before 5 February 2024. Please write “Input for indicators” in the subject field.

The Danish Gambling Authority will then forward the proposals to the Money Laundering Secretariat, which will assess whether the proposals can be implemented.

It should be noted that the indicators used in GoAML should not be confused with the Money Laundering Secretariat’s indicator list, which is a list of conditions that may give rise to consider whether it may be money laundering or terrorist financing.
The Money Laundering Secretariat’s indicator list can be found on the Prosecution Service’s website (only available in Danish).

Australia

ACMA Blocks More Illegal Gambling Websites

Published

on

Reading Time: < 1 minute

 

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has requested the Australian internet service providers (ISPs) to block more illegal gambling websites, after investigations found these services to be operating in breach of the Interactive Gambling Act 2001.

The latest sites blocked include Richard Casino and Wanted Win.

Website blocking is one of a range of enforcement options to protect Australians against illegal gambling services. This action can be taken if a service is:

  • providing prohibited interactive gambling services to customers in Australia (such as online casinos, online slot machines and services that allow in-play online sports betting)
  • providing an unlicensed regulated interactive gambling service to customers in Australia (such as online betting services that don’t have a valid Australian licence)
  • publishing ads for prohibited interactive gambling services or unlicensed regulated interactive gambling services in Australia.

Since the ACMA made its first blocking request in November 2019, 1,011 illegal gambling and affiliate websites have been blocked. Over 220 illegal services have also pulled out of the Australian market since the ACMA started enforcing illegal offshore gambling rules.

Continue Reading

Compliance Updates

Spillemyndigheden: Consultation on Updated Certification Programme for Betting and Online Casino

Published

on

Spillemyndigheden: Consultation on Updated Certification Programme for Betting and Online Casino
Reading Time: 4 minutes

 

The Danish Gambling Authority (DGA) has updated the certification programme for betting and online casino because of the introduction of supplier licences from January 1, 2025.

Interested parties can comment on the update. Comments must be sent to the DGA no later than August 19, 2024. Comments must be submitted by using the contact form.

The updated certification programme for betting and online casino will come into force on January 1, 2025. From July1, 2025, it is mandatory to use the new certification programme, but it is recommended that game suppliers and game operators adopt the updated certification programme as soon as possible.

Later this year the Danish Gambling Authority will issue updated standard reports along with the final version of the certification programme.

CHANGES

The purpose with the update is to make it more clear, which requirements licence holders and game suppliers respectively shall comply with looking forward. Furthermore, it is a part of the preparation for the introduction of the DGA’s games register, which will handle RNG- and game certificates.

Several linguistic adjustments have been made throughout the documents. In addition, the following significant changes and additions should be mentioned:

  • In SCP.00 ‘General requirements’ the following new definitions have been added: ‘Licence holder’, ‘game supplier’, ‘base platform’, ‘game platform’ and ‘game certificate’. Furthermore, the definition ‘Testing’ has been renamed to ‘Test’ and rephrased, and the definitions ‘inspection’ and ‘gambling system’ have been rephrased.
  • Looking forward licence holders and game suppliers are responsible for their own certification. This means that each actor is responsible for having certifications done and reported to the DGA. The licence holder’s former obligation to compile reports from game suppliers has been removed, because looking forward game suppliers will have their own licence and responsibility. Licence holders must still be aware of suppliers of their base platform.
  • A general change has been made to the role as supervisor, who is amongst other responsible for signing the standard reports. Looking forward the requirements for a supervisor is based on requirements for a supervisor in e.g., ISO, PCI, or CREST (see section 2.3 in SCP.00).
  • Looking forward the deadline for submitting standard reports is 1 month across all documents. Today the deadline is 2 months in several certification areas. This change is made because the licence holder’s obligation for compilation of reports from supplier licences has been removed, which the DGA considers will make the documentation and reporting of the certification process less complex and time consuming.
  • The testing- and inspection standards are omitted, and the following new documents are added:
  1. 01 ‘Requirements for RNG’ is based on requirements from the previous testing standards, but looking forward the document only contains requirements for RNG. The rest of the requirements from the testing standards are moved to SCP.07.01-03 ‘Requirements for games’, which are 3 new documents, which only contains requirements for games. See further information below.
  2. 02 ‘Requirements for base platform’ is based on requirements from the previous inspection standards, but looking forward the document only contains requirements for the base platform, which primarily covers handling of the player account. The rest of the requirements from the inspection standards are moved to SCP.07.01-03 ‘Requirements for games’. It is only the licence holder who shall be certified in accordance with the requirements in SCP.02.
  3. 07 ‘Requirements for games’ are based on requirements from the previous testing- and inspection standards, but only contain requirements for games – online betting (SCP.07.01), land-based betting (SCP.07.02) and online casino (SCP.07.03) respectively. Games suppliers shall be certified in accordance with requirements in these documents. If a licence holder produces games for their own game offer, then the licence holder is also obligated to be certified in accordance with these requirements.
  • According to SCP.01 ‘Requirements for RNG’ it is possible to postpone the certification up to 1 month. This option is also added to the new documents SCP.07 ‘Requirements for games’. RNG- and game certificates shall be uploaded to the games register 1 month at the latest after the test- and inspection have been completed. Postponing the certification means, that the certification can be completed 1 month later, but the certificate shall still be uploaded to the games register within the same deadline.
  • In SCP.04 ‘Requirements for penetration testing’ CREST accreditation is added as a recognized accreditation for companies, who perform penetration testing (see section 2.2.1).
  • In SCP.05 ‘Requirements for vulnerability scanning’ CREST accreditation is added as a recognized accreditation for companies, who perform vulnerability scans (see section 2.2.1). Furthermore, CREST CPSA and CRT certifications are added as recognized personal certifications for personnel, who plans vulnerability scans (see section 2.2.2).
  • In SCP.06 ‘Change management system’ section 4.3 about the process for approval of system changes has been changed. Since game suppliers will have their own licence looking forward, and thereby have the responsibility for their certifications themselves, they shall no longer seek approval from the licence holder ahead of making a system change. The game supplier must still be aware of situations, where it can be necessary to involve the licence holder and vice versa.
  • In SCP.06 ‘Change management programme’ a new section with a requirement about system changes, which include integration between the base- and game platform, has been added. The requirement means, that the licence holder and game supplier shall establish a business process which ensures, that the base- and game platform functions correctly after integration. The DGA do not think, that this requirement will entail further burdens on the licence holder and game supplier, since it must be expected that measures have already been taken today to ensure, that the gambling system functions correctly. The business process shall be approved by the testing organisation in connection with the annual certification of SCP.06.

The DGA draws attention to, that a consequence of the update is, that the certification programme for betting and online casino no longer has the same structure as the certification programme for lotteries and land-based casino.

Continue Reading

Compliance Updates

How Curacao new AML requirements differ from other flexible license jurisdictions

Published

on

How Curacao new AML requirements differ from other flexible license jurisdictions
Reading Time: 2 minutes

 

By: Dmitry Hotsyn, Senior Consultant and Head of CIS Desk at 4H Agency

Discussing Anti-Money Laundering (AML) rules in a way that keeps everyone awake is a real challenge. The iGaming industry often overlooks anything filled with jargon like KYC, AML, CDD, and SoWs—terms that just breed myths and misconceptions about jurisdictions supposedly having lax AML standards and low compliance burdens. For a while, Curacao was viewed as one of these almost mythical places.

Not anymore.

A significant shake-up has occurred with Curacao’s latest overhaul of its AML regulations, set to take effect on September 1, 2024. This update has triggered quite a bit of debate among gambling operators who view these new rules as unwelcoming, especially since Curacao is known for its sluggish pace in updating its gambling regulations.

But may it really be as bad as Curaçao’s deadline management?

Curacao’s AML Regulatory Changes: An Overview

Curacao is continuously revamping its regulatory frameworks, taking a page from Malta’s book — Maltifying the industry may work best to describe this process. The new AML rules, while perceived as burdensome, are in fact a balanced update alligning the Curacao practices with generally acceptable standards. Key aspects of the new regulations include:

  • Clear Customer Due Diligence (CDD) thresholds: Operators must conduct CDD at the earliest practical time, but no later than when a player engages in a transaction amounting to approximately EUR 2200;
  • Sanction and Politically Exposed Persons (PEP) Screening: Mandatory for at least EU, US and UN sanctions lists;
  • High-Risk Indicators: A detailed list of indicators for high-risk cases has been provided, noting that the use of cryptocurrencies increases risk, though it is not outright prohibited;
  • AML Officer Role: Each operator shall have a dedicated AML officer, equipped with sufficient resources and headcount to manage risks effectively;
  • Policies and Guides: Ah year, more internal docs, rules and practice guides are expected from the operators holding licences in Curacao.

Despite the extensive nature of Curacao’s new rules, in essence, they closely resemble those enforced in Malta and other EU countries, as well as competing jurisdictions offering flexible licenses. The upcoming webinar hosted by 4H Agency and Hipther Agency will delve into these comparisons, focusing on jurisdictions like Anjouan, Kanawake, and Tobique, alongside Curacao.

Key Insights on AML Across Jurisdictions

  • Detailed AML Frameworks: Curacao and Tobique lead with the most comprehensive AML regulations. Kanawake’s requirements are also robust albeit not as detailes as Curacao rules;
  • CDD Thresholds: Similar financial thresholds exist across these jurisdictions (approximately EUR 2000), with varied stipulations on the timing of CDD post-player registration (again, Curacao is not the leader here);
  • Outsourcing AML Functions: All jurisdictions permit outsourcing some AML activities to third-party providers, providing flexibility in compliance strategies;
  • Stringency of Regulations: Tobique’s regulations are notably stringent, casually requiring additional checks like adverse media searches to identify higher risk profiles;
  • Anjouan the Outlier: Anjouan stands out for its outdated AML framework, lacking specific provisions for the gambling sector. For now, this could attract operators seeking more AML-friendly environments. However, Anjouan will inevitably follow the Curacao’s reformatory steps if the country intends to make iGaming an important factor of the now-struggling economy.

The evolution of AML regulations in Curacao represents a predictable shift towards more robust regulatory environment, aligning more closely with global standards. While initially perceived as onerous, these changes are in line not only with international practices, but with the rules already in force in a competing jurisdaction.

Our upcoming webinar will further explore these developments, providing attendees with comprehensive insights into flexible licensing options in 2024.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Alpha Affiliates
Advertisement

EveryMatrix

Advertisement

Launch your iGaming business swiftly and effortlessly with our comprehensive turnkey solutions

Advertisement
Stake.com
Advertisement
xbit4.com

Trending (Top 7)

Get it on Google Play

EuropeanGaming.eu is a premier online platform that serves as a leading information hub for the gaming and gambling industry. This industry-centric media outlet reaches over 200,000 readers monthly, providing them with compelling content, the latest news, and deep-dive insights.

Offering comprehensive coverage on all aspects of the gaming sector, EuropeanGaming.eu includes online and land-based gaming, betting, esports, regulatory and compliance updates, and technological advancements. Regular features encompass daily news articles, press releases, exclusive interviews, and insightful event reports.

The platform also hosts industry-relevant virtual meetups and conferences, and provides detailed reports, making it a one-stop resource for anyone seeking information about operators, suppliers, regulators, and professional services in the European gaming market. The portal's primary goal is to keep its extensive reader base updated on the latest happenings, trends, and developments within the gaming and gambling sector, with an emphasis on the European market while also covering pertinent global news. It's an indispensable resource for gaming professionals, operators, and enthusiasts alike.

Contact us: [email protected]

Editorial / PR Submissions: [email protected]

Copyright © 2015 - 2024 - European Gaming is part of HIPTHER. Registered in Romania under Proshirt SRL, Company number: 2134306, EU VAT ID: RO21343605. Office address: Blvd. 1 Decembrie 1918 nr.5, Targu Mures, Romania

We are constantly showing banners about important news regarding events and product launches. Please turn AdBlock off in order to see these areas.