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Skin-Gambling Streamer Sues Twitch For Banning Him Two Years Ago

George Miller

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Skin-Gambling Streamer Sues Twitch For Banning Him Two Years Ago
Reading Time: 2 minutes

Counter-Strike: Global Offensive skin gambling streamer James “Phantoml0rd” Varga has filed a lawsuit against streaming platform Twitch for banning him two years ago, saying Twitch breached its contract by improperly suspending him.

Varga had amassed over a million followers on Twitch before the goliath streaming company kicked him off in July, 2016. He was one of the top ten streamers on the site, where fans viewed his content more than 88 million times.

Varga earned followers streaming League of Legends, but in 2014, pivoted to something shadier: CS:GO skin gambling. In YouTube videos and on Twitch, Varga recorded himself winning anywhere from $600 to several thousand dollars in skin lotteries on sites like CSGOShuffle. An exposé by journalist Richard Lewis reported that Varga was affiliated with CSGOShuffle and potentially owned it without disclosing that in his content.

After the exposé, in July, 2016, Twitch slammed the ban hammer down on Varga. Now, Varga is fighting to get his Twitch channel back and win compensation for financial damages due to his ban.

The reason for Varga’s ban was threefold, although in the suit, Varga complains that he wasn’t provided with a solid reason until after his ban. Varga allegedly violated the site’s content guidelines by claiming fake bot subscribers and broadcasting non-gaming content. (At the time, Twitch did not allow streamers to venture outside of gaming.) He was allegedly streaming too much of this skin gambling and not enough good ol’ games. (The new lawsuit quotes Varga’s manager asking him to stream skin gambling in spurts of thirty minutes or less, or he’d get flagged for a suspension).

Perhaps more importantly, Twitch says Varga’s skin-gambling stream violated the company’s Terms of Service. Promoting your CS:GO gambling site without disclosing it’s yours violates both Valve’s ToS and FTC rules, therefore also violating Twitch’s ToS. In the meantime, Varga has been streaming on YouTube, which is known to be a little more hands-off about its streamers’ content.

The lawsuit, filed on February 14th in the Superior Court of California, claims that Varga was banned in an improper manner and, perhaps, should not have been banned at all. Varga did not violate the site’s Terms of Service, the suit argues, citing Lewis’s “unsubstantiated allegations” against him in his expose. If Lewis was wrong that Varga owned or was affiliated with CSGOShuffle, there wasn’t a good reason to ban him, the lawsuit suggests.

The lawsuit reads, “Twitch apparently accepted as true false allegations published by an unscrupulous commentator,” adding, “As a result of Twitch’s improper suspension of Varga’s Twitch.tv account, and also as a result of Twitch’s misrepresentation as to what content Varga was permitted to broadcast, Varga has incurred significant monetary damages.” In a YouTube video posted yesterday, Lewis denies that his report was unsubstantiated. The lawsuit also does not specifically say that Varga had no connection with CSGOShuffle.

The suit goes on to accuse Twitch of using Varga to “deflect negative press” over the CS:GO gambling scandal and “divert attention from the fact that Twitch continued to knowingly allow such conduct to continue on other Twitch channels.” Twitch declined a request for comment, explaining that it does not talk about pending litigation. Varga has not responded to a request for comment.

Even though Twitch’s guidelines have expanded to include an IRL section, where streamers can do whatever they want, Varga couldn’t come back and skin-gamble, even if he was unbanned. CS:GO skin-gambling still violates Valve’s Terms of Service.

 

Source: kotaku.com

George Miller started his career in content marketing and has started working as an Editor/Content Manager for our company in 2016. George has acquired many experiences when it comes to interviews and newsworthy content becoming Head of Content in 2017. He is responsible for the news being shared on multiple websites that are part of the European Gaming Media Network.

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eSports

Sega to launch eSports version of Puyo Puyo series

Niji Ng

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Sega to launch eSports version of Puyo Puyo series
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Sega, the pioneering Japanese gaming company, is planning to launch the eSports version of its popular game series Puyo Puyo. The new version will be recognised by Japan’s official eSports union. The game, titled Puyo Puyo eSports, first will be available in Nintendo Switch and PlayStation 4 from October. An arcade version is also on the cards.

Puyo Puyo eSports looks very similar in presentation to 2014’s Puyo Puyo Tetris, minus the Tetris component. The esports-focused spin on the blob-dropping puzzle game takes its rules from two previous entries: Puyo Puyo 2 (first released in 1994) and Puyo Puyo Fever (first released in 2003). Puyo Puyo eSports will feature 24 characters from across the franchise.

The new version of Puyo Puyo is authorized by the Japan esports Union (JeSU), an organisation established in cooperation with the Japanese government that aims to promote and disseminate esports in the country, as well as provide actual licenses for professional players. The organisations members include developers and publishers such as Arc System Works, Bandai Namco, Capcom, Konami, Microsoft and Sony Interactive Entertainment.

The chairman of JeSU, Hideki Okamura, is also president and chief operating officer of Sega Holdings, parent company of publisher Sega.

Puyo Puyo eSports will be released digitally in Japan on October 25, priced at 1,999 yen (15.25 Euro’s).

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eSports

Esports Entertainment Group Signs Affiliate Marketing Agreements with Additional 34 Esports Teams, Bringing Total To 134 Esports Teams

George Miller

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Esports Entertainment Group Signs Affiliate Marketing Agreements with Additional 34 Esports Teams, Bringing Total To 134 Esports Teams
Reading Time: 3 minutes

 

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. (OTCQB:GMBL) (or the “Company”), a licensed online gambling company with a specific focus on esports wagering and 18+ gaming, is pleased to announce Affiliate Marketing Agreements with 34 additional esports teams as the Company continues to ramp up affiliate marketing activities in support of its recent launch of vie.gg, the world’s first and most transparent esports betting exchange.

The addition of these 34 esports teams brings the total number of esports team affiliates to 134 since the Company’s first announcement on April 5th, representing a major milestone for Esports Entertainment Group, as well as, a major event within the esports world where no other esports wagering site has ever signed an Affiliate Marketing Agreement with an esports team.  The Company anticipates many more Affiliate Marketing Agreements with esports teams throughout 2018.

NEWEST ESPORT TEAM AFFILIATES EXPAND GLOBAL REACH INTO SOUTH AND CENTRAL AMERICA

The addition of the 34 esports teams below represents a significant geographical expansion and balancing of the Company’s partners.  Whereas the first 60 esports teams were heavily concentrated in Europe, the last 74 esports teams have primarily come from South and Central America.  The geographical distribution of our most recent esports team affiliate partners is as follows:

  • Brazil: 16
  • Argentina: 5
  • Peru: 4
  • Colombia: 2
  • Chile: 2
  • Ecuador: 2
  • Venezuela: 1
  • Paraguay: 1
  • Honduras: 1

Grant Johnson, CEO of Esports Entertainment Group, stated, “We want to welcome all of our new esports team partners from South America. The region has a huge esports fan base and we look forward to working closely with these teams as they engage with their fans at home and around the globe.”

VIE.GG

vie.gg offers bet exchange style wagering on esports events in a licensed, regulated and secured platform to the global esports audience, excluding jurisdictions that prohibit online gambling. vie.gg features wagering on the following esports games:

  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (CSGO)
  • League of Legends
  • Dota 2
  • Call of Duty
  • Overwatch
  • PUBG
  • Hearthstone
  • StarCraft II

This press release is available on our Online Investor Relations Community for shareholders and potential shareholders to ask questions, receive answers and collaborate with management in a fully moderated forum at https://agoracom.com/ir/EsportsEntertainmentGroup

 

About Esports Entertainment Group

Esports Entertainment Group, Inc. is a licensed online gambling company with a specific focus on esports wagering and 18+ gaming. Esports Entertainment offers bet exchange style wagering on esports events in a licensed, regulated and secure platform to the global esports audience at vie.gg.  In addition, Esports Entertainment intends to offer users from around the world the ability to participate in multi-player mobile and PC video game tournaments for cash prizes. Esports Entertainment is led by a team of industry professionals and technical experts from the online gambling and the video game industries, and esports. The Company holds licenses to conduct online gambling and 18+ gaming on a global basis in Curacao, Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Kahnawake Gaming Commission in Canada. The Company maintains offices in Antigua, Curacao and Warsaw, Poland. Esports Entertainment common stock is listed on the OTCQB under the symbol GMBL.  For more information visit www.esportsentertainmentgroup.com
.
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
The information contained herein includes forward-looking statements. These statements relate to future events or to our future financial performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance, or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements since they involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which are, in some cases, beyond our control and which could, and likely will, materially affect actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Any forward-looking statement reflects our current views with respect to future events and is subject to these and other risks, uncertainties and assumptions relating to our operations, results of operations, growth strategy and liquidity. We assume no obligation to publicly update or revise these forward-looking statements for any reason, or to update the reasons actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future. The safe harbor for forward-looking statements contained in the Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 protects companies from liability for their forward-looking statements if they comply with the requirements of the Act.

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Riot Games unveils “LoL PARK” new LCK Esports stadium!

Niji Ng

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Riot Games unveils “LoL PARK” new LCK Esports stadium!
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Riot Games, a California-based game developer has unveiled its new League of Legends exclusive stadium called “Lol PARK.” The new facility is located at Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea. It can host up to 500 people. The most important section of the stadium is a section in the form of a round open booth. Here, players are able to sit and play in the centre whilst the spectators can watch the players live. Due to the audience’s seats being in close proximity with the stage, the audience is able to even see a player’s individual screen. In addition, there is an incredibly large screen located at the top of the stage. This screen offers full picture quality from a multitude of angles, allowing the audience to watch the game without the slightest issue. The screen allows quality entertainment regardless of being at the front or back of the stage.

Also, there is a box specifically made for the coaching staff which is located on the outskirts of the stage. This box is clearly visible to the audience and adds yet another perk to the experience. After a game, the players are provided with a joint coverage area or interview zone in which they can interact in new ways with their fans. In addition, unlike fan meetings in the past when it was rushed and held outdoors, the LoL PARK provides a prepared fan meeting zone inside the facility.

Lee Seung Hyun, the representative of Riot Games Korea, commented, “I only hope that LoL PARK can provide a unique experience to everyday life. Jongno is a place that has a lot of companies and a lot more employees. I’d like this facility to be a place where you look twice and visit when you see it. The League focused stadium is more of an arena style than a studio. I have made sure and prepared this place to be a pleasant space for players. In addition, I did my best to set up various attractions and comfortable facilities for the audience who might visit here.”

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