Connect with us
SIS

Compliance Updates

Belgium to regulate advertising on iGaming

Niji Narayan

Published

on

Reading Time: 1 minute

Going forward the advertisings via online gaming platforms will be managed by the Belgian Government.

A bill regulating the advertising market with regard to online gaming businesses was passed by the Congress of Belgium. After reviewing the bill the national Government allegedly sent it to the European Commission with the intention of acquiring the ultimate approval to execute the new legislation restricting iGaming publicity.

Online casino industry, sports betting operations and the affiliate sectors are the ones that will be impacted by the potential legislation as it could confine the advertising strategies in regards of those industries at national level. The Council of Ministers of Belgium lately put forward the proposal and sent it to the European Commission this week.

In compliance with the new legislation, if approved by the European Commission, online gaming advertising would prohibit publicity on “bonuses except on licensed operators’ websites.” Moreover, the companies would be confined to send publicity to emails or telephones of current clients. The rest of the advertising strategies would be limited to licensed companies’ platforms.

Last year, the Belgian Council of Ministers favoured Minister of Justice Koen Geens’ proposal to set restrictions on gambling promotion, mainly on broadcast media. Since then, industry’s ads are banned from being broadcasted before 8 pm, from any live sporting events and even bars any gambling promotion messages from sports equipment and kits.

Niji Narayan has been in the writing industry for well over a decade or so. He prides himself as one of the few survivors left in the world who have actually mastered the impossible art of copy editing. Niji graduated in Physics and obtained his Master’s degree in Communication and Journalism. He has always interested in sports writing and travel writing. He has written for numerous websites and his in-depth analytical articles top sports magazines like Cricket Today and Sports Today. He reports gaming industry headlines from all around the globe.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Comments

Compliance Updates

Missouri Gaming Commission Considers Gaming Terminals as Illegal

Niji Narayan

Published

on

Missouri Gaming Commission Considers Gaming Terminals as Illegal
Photo Source: bmmagazine.co.uk
Reading Time: 1 minute

 

The Missouri Gaming Commission has deemed the gaming terminals illegal to slow the rapid-fire spread of untaxed and unregulated slot machines in Missouri.

The lead attorney for the Missouri Gaming Commission ruled that the terminals contain functions that make them “gambling devices,” which are prohibited outside of licensed casinos.

The ruling came in response to a question by the St. James Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5608, which asked if having one of the terminals in their facility would jeopardise the organisation’s state-issued bingo license.

After testing the machine, the gaming commission said it would.

Although the gaming commission’s findings only apply to establishments that have bingo licenses, the decision comes as state and county officials are investigating what to do about the machines.

The terminals work like slot machines. A player inserts money, selects a game and decides how much to wager. Players who win money can cash out and get paid by the store cashier.

May Scheve Reardon, executive director of the Missouri Lottery told that she fears the terminals could divert money from the lottery’s games, which generate money for public schools.

Senate President Dave Schatz, R-Sullivan, also has pushed for legislation that would prohibit the machines and strip businesses of their liquor licenses if the terminals are present.

Dave Grothaus, executive director of the Gaming Commission said there have been discussions about whether state officials, like the commission, could use their licensing powers to strip businesses of their ability to sell lottery tickets or alcohol if they have the slot machines on their premises.

“Certainly that would be an administrative tool that the state could use to address the problem,” Grothaus said.

Continue Reading

Canada

Canada Amends the Criminal Code Offence of Money Laundering

Niji Narayan

Published

on

Canada Amends the Criminal Code Offence of Money Laundering
Photo Source: theguardian.pe.ca
Reading Time: 1 minute

 

The Government of Canada has amended the Criminal Code offence of money laundering. The regulation changes criminalise moving money on behalf of someone despite money laundering suspicions.

“This change modernises Canada’s money laundering criminal offences to be consistent with key allies (e.g. U.K. and Australia) and provides an additional tool to disrupt and more effectively investigate and prosecute money laundering, particularly when dealing with sophisticated actors such as professional launderers,” Finance Department spokesman Greg Sommerville said.

Canada also considers other recommendations produced in the past 18 months. 120 recommendations were filed, but only 19 have been approved so far.

“Canada has fallen so far behind for so many years, we’re playing catch-up,” James Cohen, executive director of Transparency International Canada said.

Continue Reading

Compliance Updates

Spain Approves the Creation of Commission to Combat Sports Manipulation

Niji Narayan

Published

on

Spain Approves the Creation of Commission to Combat Sports Manipulation
Reading Time: 1 minute

 

The Ministry of the Presidency in Spain has approved the creation of a national commission to combat match-fixing and betting-related fraud.

According to the Ministry, the commission will “develop action plans [and] recommendations or diagnoses to detect, prevent and combat illegal actions in the field of sports competitions and fraud in betting.”

Members of the commission will include representatives of Spain’s gambling regulator (DGOJ), the National Police, the Civil Guard, the Higher Sports Council and persons related to sports competitions and the betting sector. The Commission will be chaired on a rotating basis by the head of the DGOJ and the Directorate General of Sports.

The commission’s first task will be to develop a new early warning system developed by the DGOJ, which is intended to act as a point of communication to prevent match-fixing and fraud.

“Corruption linked to the manipulation of sports competitions and betting-related fraud are two of the greatest threats to sport and horse racing, as it undermines each sport’s core values ​​and ruins the experience for fans and spectators. For this reason… the Government has considered it necessary to establish at the national level a formalised channel of dialogue and cooperation between public authorities, sports organizations, organizers of competitions sports and representatives of the gaming sector,” the Ministry said.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
NSoft

Global Gaming Industry Newsletter – Weekly Digest (sent every Wednesday)

Please select all the ways you would like to hear from European Gaming Media and Events:

You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the link in the footer of our emails. For information about our privacy practices, please visit our website.

We use Mailchimp as our marketing platform. By clicking below to subscribe, you acknowledge that your information will be transferred to Mailchimp for processing. Learn more about Mailchimp's privacy practices here. Read more about European Gaming Media and Event's Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

Subscribe to our News via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to our news and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Latest by author

Trending

Notice for AdBlock users

We are constantly showing banners about important news regarding events and product launches. Please turn AdBlock off in order to see these areas.